Lean and cycle time

I am working on implementing OEE in one of our machines that makes centertubes for automotive oil filters. The steel is rolled and each part number has specific diameter and length. However, the run-rates vary for each part numbers. I am somewhat able to calculate Takt time for each part number based on the standard run-rate. However, the problem for me is to determine Ideal Cycle Time. The machine can run as fast as 65 PPM for one part number while it runs as slow as 13 PPM for some other part number. In this case, what would be the optimal way to calculate Ideal Cycle Time for each part numbers? As you know, Ideal Cycle time is required to calculate Performance Metric of OEE.

He serves on the advisory board of a number of technology startups, and has consulted to new and established companies as well as venture capital firms. In 2010, he was named entrepreneur-in-residence at Harvard Business School and is currently an IDEO Fellow. Previously he co-founded and served as CTO of IMVU, his third startup. In 2007, BusinessWeek named him one of the Best Young Entrepreneurs of Tech. In 2009, he was honored with a TechFellow award in the category of Engineering Lean Startup methodology has been written about in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review,Inc. (where he appeared on the cover), Wired, Fast Company, and countless blogs. He lives in San Francisco.

Thanks for clearing up a general misconception. I myself used the term incorrectly for a while, then realized the difference – as you put it so clearly – and now I make sure to stress the distinction so others will not have the same confusion I did. In manufacturing, it may be self-evident, but in a service industry without automated / regulated flow, the terms are similar enough that it’s easy to be confused if you don’t start with a good definition. Thanks for giving us that and a good example as well,
Sue K.

Ries and others created an annual technology conference called Startup Lessons Learned which has subsequently changed its name to the Lean Startup Conference. [32] Lean startup meetups in cities around the world have garnered 20,000 regular participants. [6] The first lean startup meetup named Lean Startup Circle was created by Rich Collins on June 26, 2009 [33] hosting speaking events, workshops, and roundtable discussions. As of 2012, there are lean startup meetups in over 100 cities and 17 countries as well as an online discussion forum with over 5500 members. [34] Third-party organizers have led lean startup meetups in San Francisco , Chicago , Boston , Austin , Beijing , Dublin , and Rio de Janeiro , among others—many of which are personally attended by Ries—with the Chicago and New York City Lean Startup Meetups attracting over 4,000 members each. [35] The Lean Startup Machine created a new spin on the lean startup meetups by having attendees start a new company in three days. [36] As of 2012, the Lean Startup Machine claimed to have created over 600 new startups this way. [37]

Lean and cycle time

lean and cycle time

Ries and others created an annual technology conference called Startup Lessons Learned which has subsequently changed its name to the Lean Startup Conference. [32] Lean startup meetups in cities around the world have garnered 20,000 regular participants. [6] The first lean startup meetup named Lean Startup Circle was created by Rich Collins on June 26, 2009 [33] hosting speaking events, workshops, and roundtable discussions. As of 2012, there are lean startup meetups in over 100 cities and 17 countries as well as an online discussion forum with over 5500 members. [34] Third-party organizers have led lean startup meetups in San Francisco , Chicago , Boston , Austin , Beijing , Dublin , and Rio de Janeiro , among others—many of which are personally attended by Ries—with the Chicago and New York City Lean Startup Meetups attracting over 4,000 members each. [35] The Lean Startup Machine created a new spin on the lean startup meetups by having attendees start a new company in three days. [36] As of 2012, the Lean Startup Machine claimed to have created over 600 new startups this way. [37]

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