Lean development cycle

This is a good question. First, one lifecycle clearly does not fit all. Teams find themselves in a unique situation: team members are unique individuals with their own skills and preferences for working, let alone the scaling/tailoring factors such as team size, geographic distribution, domain complexity, organizational culture, and so on which vary by team. Because teams find themselves in a wide variety of situations shouldn’t a framework such as DA support several lifecycles? Furthermore, just from the raging debates on various agile discussion forums, in agile user groups, at agile conferences, and even within organizations themselves it’s very easy to empirically observe that agile teams are in fact following different types of lifecycles.

The system is being complete replaced . It is not uncommon to see homegrown systems for human resource functions being replaced by COTS systems such as SAP or Oracle Financials.

  • The release is no longer to be supported . Sometimes organizations will have several releases in production at the same time, and over time older releases are dropped.
  • The system no longer needed to support the current business model . A organization may explore a new business area by developing new systems only to discover that it is not cost effective.
  • The system is redundant . Organizations that grow by mergers and/or acquisitions often end up with redundant systems as they consolidate their operations.
  • The system has become obsolete .
  • In most cases, the retirement of older releases is a handled during the deployment of a newer version of the system and is a relatively simple exercise. Typically, the deployment of the new release includes steps to remove the previous release. There are times, however, when you do not retire a release simply because you deploy a newer version. This may happen if you can not require users to migrate to the new release or if you must maintain an older system for backward compatibility.

    I am working on implementing OEE in one of our machines that makes centertubes for automotive oil filters. The steel is rolled and each part number has specific diameter and length. However, the run-rates vary for each part numbers. I am somewhat able to calculate Takt time for each part number based on the standard run-rate. However, the problem for me is to determine Ideal Cycle Time. The machine can run as fast as 65 PPM for one part number while it runs as slow as 13 PPM for some other part number. In this case, what would be the optimal way to calculate Ideal Cycle Time for each part numbers? As you know, Ideal Cycle time is required to calculate Performance Metric of OEE.

    Lean development cycle

    lean development cycle

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